Logo - Nevada SNAP Education
  • When you have a shopping list. Stick to the list.
  • No more than once a week.
  • When the store is least crowded.
  • When you have time to compare the nutrition and prices of similar foods.
  • After having a healthy meal or snack, not when you are hungry or thirsty.
  • When you can go alone. Have a friend or adult family member keep your children. If you need to shop with children, teach them shopping skills so they can help.
  • On double or triple coupon days.
  • Where you find the best prices. Find prices at stores, online, in newspaper inserts and in your price book. A price book allows you to keep track of the foods you often purchase.  Write the price of each item at the store you buy it from.  Then you will know when a sale is a good deal or not.
  • Include the cost of gas when deciding where to shop.
  • Check prices at discount and dollar stores for items like cleaning supplies, personal-care products and pet food.
  • Check out farmers’ markets and food co-ops.
  • Look into stores that offer loyalty cards.
  • If you use coupons, look for stores that offer double- or triple-coupon days.
  • Buy only as much as you have budgeted for the shopping trip.
  • Buy only the amount of food you will eat while it is fresh.
  • Bigger packages often cost less per unit of contents. Compare unit prices to be sure. Divide large packages into smaller serving sizes and store them for later use. Buying big packages may encourage you to eat larger portions.
  • Buying from bulk bins lets you choose how much to buy and usually costs less per unit.
  • Only what is on your shopping list.
  • Nutrient-rich foods. Read and compare Nutrition Facts labels. (Read about Nutrition Facts labels in the following sections.)
  • Store or generic brands. Many are the same or very similar in quality and nutrition to national brands.
  • The least-expensive form of food that will work for you (fresh, frozen or canned).
  • The freshest food possible. Check sell-by and use-by dates.
  • Items marked low salt, low fat, reduced sugar, packed in water or packed in natural juice.
  • Impulse items—things that catch your attention but are not on your list.
  • Convenience foods—foods that are fully or partially prepared when you buy them, such as boxed casserole mixes, precooked roasted chicken or premade sandwiches or salads. They are almost always more expensive than foods you make from scratch. They are also often higher in fat, sodium and sugar and lower in fiber and other nutrients.
  • Bulging, swollen, rusty or severely dented cans.
  • Foods with little nutritional value such as chips, candy, cookies and soda.
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